November 2021 New Moon

Dancing with the Ancestors
by Tabita Rezaire

Thursday, November 4th, 2021
New Moon in Scorpio at 2:15pm PST

November's New Moon opens up a new lunar cycle before us, above us, and within us. The sky is devoid of moonlight, giving the whole stage to the stars, planets, and the fecund darkness between them. As we look to the night, our gaze often searches and settles on familiar celestial bodies, but what if we looked into the dark bareness of the sky? Emptiness can be frightening as it echoes the emptiness we feel inside, so we grasp onto something, or someone, hoping to be recused from ourselves. Yet, the void is such a powerful place, state, and portal—all emptiness is filled with the potential of totality.

This New Moon is an opportunity to contemplate the depth of our being and reach the space from which creation sprung. A journey into the unknown, only when we embrace the state of not knowing will the potential to know arise. From there, we may experience the vastness and spaciousness of existence. For we are so vast... beyond description...

As someone working with the land in Amazonia, we are currently in the last weeks of the dry season. Hopefully, this lunation will bless us with the first rains, as we welcome the start of Eclipse season. Transformation lies ahead. The soils are ready, are we?

Let us create a territory so fertile that when the rain comes, we sprout abundantly.

—Excerpt from the 2021 Many Moons Lunar Planner. Read the full essay here and order a copy of the 2022 edition here

Tabita Rezaire is a devout spiritual seeker who uses art, the science of yoga, her work as a doula, and her connection to ancestors and land to guide her homecoming to soul. Her work centers on decolonial healing, where technology and spirituality intersect as fertile ground to nourish visions of connection and emancipation. Tabita is based in Cayenne in French Guyana where she is birthing Amakaba, a healing center in the amazonian forest. Visit Tabita’s website at www.tabitarezaire.com and www.amakaba.org

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